Tag: Hero vs Protagonists

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#1 by LinkSpider
2022-06-07 at 06:00
< report >As a Non-native Speaker, I can't tell the difference between the tag subtree of "Hero" and "Protagonist", Google says they are identical in fiction, which refers to the main character.

1. I feel confused "One or more of the heroes in this game are adults" means "the one who saves or protects the world and other people" or "the main character in the novels"
2. Why do two tag trees' keywords have the same meaning if we can use one word to describe
3. If they are different sometimes, how should I tell

Sorry for my glitch in English, your bits of help mean a lot to me.

___________________________________________________________________
Protagonist
> Death of Protagonist (772)
> Multiple Protagonists
> No Protagonist (58)
> Observer Protagonist (20)
> Protagonist Gender Choice (314)
> 3 more tags
_________________________________________
Hero
> Both Male and Female Love Interests (492)
> Death of Hero (291)
> Hero's Role/Vocation
> Hero's Traits
> More Than Seven Heroes (189)
> 2 more tags
#2 by cubky
2022-06-07 at 06:16
< report >I would say the explanation in Hero is pretty clear:

Heroes are the male members of a game's cast with their own routes and/or endings.
These types of characters are almost exclusively found in otome games.
Do not mix with a VN's lead male character, that is called a protagonist.
#3 by nazim10
2022-06-07 at 06:56
< report >I get OP's confusion, as in many languages, the hero of the story is the protagonist. But, to over-simplify things:
Protagonist: main character, you play/read as him.
Hero: a character that have a route, whether in an otome game or a BL one.
#4 by kiru
2022-06-07 at 07:10
< report >Truth be told, hero/heroine is a weird way of calling characters that have a route, but just consider that it comes from Japan and you probably understand. You have to call it in some way anyways, so why not.

Sometimes words end up with multiple meanings. The old school hero, aka the heroic kind of hero, is still a hero in Japan as well. (think Dragon Quest)
#5 by kratoscar2008
2022-06-07 at 07:47
< report >Yeah it's confusing. Specially when some games about rape use Hero to refer to the rapist protagonist.
#6 by LinkSpider
2022-06-07 at 09:37
< report >In VN games, The protagonist refers to the character in the main narrative point of view, and Hero/heroine to a character having routes. Your replies solve my confusion properlly and totally. Thank you very much, have a great day!
#7 by kei-tr
2022-06-07 at 13:25
< report >I don't know if this is an oversight of database but in some rare cases a character can still be a hero/heroine if they are important enough even though they don't have a route. link link and link first ones to come to mind. I didn't see any examples of anyone called protagonist without having significant time of narrative point of view though.Last modified on 2022-06-07 at 13:31
#8 by Ezezin
2022-06-07 at 15:58
< report >It's not an oversight. The Hero and Heroine tags are so subjective that people use them for a lot of reasons: characters with routes, romanceables, that participates in sex scenes, rape scenes, female characters in a Kinetic Novel, every party member of a RPG or games that have a party or group for several reasons, every main character from a Group of Friends, etc.

People tried giving a clear definition of what is hero and heroine for proper tagging, but so far users couldn't reach a consensus about that.Last modified on 2022-06-07 at 16:05
#9 by bobjr2000
2022-06-08 at 05:39
< report >I think its pretty clear according to definition they have it on here. But I can understand if English is your second language why it would be confusing. They are not using dictionary definition but own definition.

"cast with their own routes and/or endings." is all hero or heroine means on this website. Doesn't have any correlation to other definition which could imply being a good person or does good deeds etc.

Though not a 100% wrong might be able to use a different words but given culture of VN I think most people can figure it out.

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